The Worshipful Company of Glass Sellers of London

The Worshipful Company of Glass Sellers of London received its Charter in 1664. Initially founded to regulate the Glass Selling and Pot-Making industries within the City of London, the role of the livery company today is to:

  • Maintain cordial relationships within the Company, the City and the wider glass industry
  • Stimulate interest in glass in all its aspects
  • Carry out charitable works, with special emphasis on education
  • Maintain the Company’s traditions, values and customs
  • Provide pastoral care for members in distress
  • Support the Lord Mayor & the Corporation of the City of London
Our site contains a wealth of interesting information about our livery company, its history and traditions and about glass; one of the most versatile and useful materials ever discovered by mankind. A versatility that continues to this day. The pages of this website will almost certainly have passed along fibre optic cables on their way to your computer. If you are viewing this site on a handheld device it is very likely that its screen is made of glass – indispensable uses for glass in the modern world.
Glass is possibly the most malleable of substances; it can be fashioned into shapes and used for more purposes than any other material.
Our purpose is to support the wider glass industry, the City and its specific appeals, Education and the less privileged in and around the City of London.
Today, more than ever, building and maintaining professional and personal relationships is central to who we are.

Members in the news – Liveryman David Wilkinson

August 13, 2020

WE ARE FINALLY BLOWING GLASS………………
Carl Nordbruch, our glassblower for the last 20 years is now blowing glass at Wilkinson’s new glasshouse in Sittingbourne
Over the last couple of months we have shared with you,the transformation from raw materials to built furnaces, glory holes and lehrs that have been installed
On 21st July,after many months of waiting, the gas was connected. It took a week for the glass to get up to the required temperature of 1140 degrees centigrade. . Carl was then able to blow our first pieces of glass with his skilful assistant Peter.

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